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Microsoft and Facebook just laid a 160-terabits-per-second cable 4,100 miles across the Atlantic

Admin Sep 25,2017

Microsoft, Facebook, and the telecoms framework organization Telxius have reported the fruition of the most noteworthy limit subsea link to ever cross the Atlantic Ocean. The link is equipped for transmitting 160 terabits of information for each second, the likeness spilling 71 million HD recordings in the meantime, and 16 million times speedier than a normal home web association, Microsoft claims. The link will be operational by mid 2018.

Called Marea, which is Spanish for “tide,” the 4,000 mile long subsea link lies 17,000 feet underneath the sea surface and stretches out between Virginia Beach, Virginia and the city of Bilbao in Spain. Marea additionally extends a course south of most existing transoceanic links. Along these lines, Microsoft says the link will give flexibility to those living in the US and Europe by defending against catastrophic events or other significant occasions that may make disturbances associations like those seen amid Hurricane Sandy. All the more critically to Microsoft and Facebook: the two organizations have vast server farm operations in Virginia.

“Marea comes at a critical time,” said Brad Smith, president of Microsoft. “Submarine cables in the Atlantic already carry 55 percent more data than trans-Pacific routes and 40 percent more data than between the US and Latin America. There is no question that the demand for data flows across the Atlantic will continue to increase.” For most of the route, the cable — made up of eight pairs of fiber optic cables enclosed by copper — lays on the ocean floor. Some parts are buried to protect from shipping traffic, usually in areas closer to the shore.

In a blog post, Microsoft said the project was completed nearly three times faster than usual, in under two years. Marea’s cables are an “open” design, which will allow it to evolve as technology does, and as the population of internet users around the world jumps. The Marea cable also provides a path to network hubs in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, where the next billion internet users are anticipated to come from.

Tech companies are increasingly moving into the infrastructure space, funding new cables themselves, rather than joining telecom consortiums which operate undersea cables already. Google has also invested in two cables that run from the US to Japan, South America, and other countries in Asia. With the Marea cable, Facebook and Microsoft’s investment gives them more control over the vast amounts of data they need to move quickly around the world. Both companies will benefit from improvements in cloud services for products like Microsoft’s Office 365, Azure, and Xbox Live, and Facebook’s Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp.